How Can We Get There?

by Katie Riegel

 

I recently got back from vacation (see my last post!) and one of my friends, as friends will, asked how I was readjusting to being home. I said, “On vacation, every day was about planning how much …

Source: How Can We Get There?

 

I recently got back from vacation (see my last post!) and one of my friends, as friends will, asked how I was readjusting to being home. I said, “On vacation, every day was about planning how much fun to pack into the day. I wish every day was about that still.”

My friend said, “So how does every day become about how much fun you can pack in? How can we get there?”

Whoa.

It’s easy to blow off a question like that, to jokepermanent vacation or win the lottery orheavy drug use. It’s easy to give up, to accept the “real world” in which vacation is supposed to be different from regular life—the dessert, as it were, to regular life’s green beans and white meat.

But what if we actually think about the question?

I believe, passionately, in asking the questions. I believe in all the uncomfortable pushing and pulling and cutting and sewing involved in making a life.

Apologizing for Existing

From the raw, wise, and always wonderful Katie Riegel, another tender admission of vulnerability.

“When we feel like a burden on our loved ones, the comic recommends, we should thank them for their love and support rather than apologizing.

This recommendation is both lovely and smart. Words matter. Practicing gratitude has been linked to greater happiness and other benefits. And being acknowledged for their own wonderful selves gives our friends and loved ones more strength and energy to continue to support us. ‘Thank you’ creates a positivity loop.”

 

Source: Apologizing for Existing

Another Story

Over at The Gloria Sirens, we decided that during February, we would concentrate on our love of language, and we are going out with a BANG with some quietly fierce fiction by Paula Whyman. Yes, we’re logophiles; so are many of you. As Lisa Lanser Rose wrote on Feb. 1, “We love language, we sing praise to writers, we live for readers, we cherish poetry and prose and song. The dictionary is a box of bon-bons for the brain.” We hope you enjoy this rumination over (mostly) one word and many of its implications.

Read “Another Story” by Paula Whyman here.